CEC Journal Articles on Transition

CEC
Nine Strategies to Improve College Transition Planning for Students With Disabilities
Fri, 20 Dec 2013 15:59:16 GMT

Research shows that many students with LD and ADHD who attend college are not earning their degree within a traditional time frame. Part of the explanation for this lies in the shifts that students encounter when they get to college, where the disability accommodation system and academic environment are different from what students have experienced in high school. These can be a real challenge to students' degree completion. But if high schools properly prepare students for college by educating them about the college disability system and academic expectations and by helping them develop self-knowledge about their learning profile, they can help to improve outcomes for these students. This article provides nine strategies to assist districts in creating a comprehensive plan to help students with LD and ADHD make a successful transition to college.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category learning disabilities, ADD, disability services and accommodations, transition planning, students with disabilities, college transition, self-advocacy
  • Pages 53-59
  • Authors
    • Elizabeth C. Hamblet, Columbia University, New York, New York
Triangulated IEP Transition Goals: Developing Relevant and Genuine Annual Goals
Fri, 14 Jun 2013 15:34:26 GMT

Special education professionals are charged to develop relevant, compliant, and legally defensible IEPs for transition-age students with disabilities. This charge is intensified as educators strive to provide plans that will genuinely prepare students for postsecondary education, employment, and independent living. This manuscript demonstrates how annual goals align with postsecondary goals through triangulation of (a) linking transition and academic assessments, (b) embedding industry and content standards related to postsecondary goals, and (c) conducting skill and knowledge gap analyses. This process ensures educators that annual goals are genuine and relevant to postsecondary goals, legally defensible, and meet the standards of compliance.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category postsecondary goals, transition planning, transition IEP, IEP goals
  • Pages 46-57
  • Authors
    • Lori Y. Peterson, School of Special Education, University of Northern, Colorado, Greeley
    • Jon Paul Burden, Exceptional Student Services, Weld RE-4 School District, Windsor, Colorado
    • Jennifer M. Sedaghat, Exceptional Student Services, Weld RE-4 School District, Windsor, Colorado
    • June E. Gothberg, Office of the Vice President for Research, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
    • Paula D. Kohler, Office of the Vice President for Research, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
    • Jennifer L. Coyle, Office of the Vice President for Research, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
Helping Students With Disabilities Transition to College
Mon, 16 Apr 2012 18:09:30 GMT

Making the transition from high school to college poses challenges for most students. Moving from a secure, regulated world of secondary education into an unfamiliar environment requiring greater independence can be a destabilizing experience. For students with learning disabilities (LD) and/or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), managing this change can make them feel more anxious and overwhelmed than their non-disabled counterparts. The twenty tips featured in this article are intended for counselors, teachers, and parents to share with high school students with LD and/or ADD before they transition into college. Once there, students with LD and/or ADD will be expected to be autonomous in their decision-making. By previewing these strategies, teachers and parents can increase student awareness of situations they will encounter, help them play an active role in making important decisions, and generally guide them toward a greater chance of success.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category LD, ADD, ADD/ADHD, college, self-advocacy, postsecondary, transition, college
  • Pages 16-25
  • Authors
    • David J. Connor, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York
A Program Evaluation Tool for Dual Enrollment Transition Programs
Mon, 16 Apr 2012 18:09:30 GMT

This article describes the development and use of a program evaluation tool designed to support self-assessment of college-based dual enrollment transition programs serving students with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 18-21 in college settings. The authors describe the need for such an evaluation tool, outline the areas addressed by the tool including program planning, staffing, administration, student planning, student activities, employment, self-determination, interagency collaboration, monitoring and evaluation and provides a description of how it can be used to evaluate and improve services in dual enrollment transition programs in college settings.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category program evaluation, intellectual disability, postsecondary education, dual enrollment, transition services
  • Pages 36-45
  • Authors
    • Meg Grigal, Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston
    • Amy Dwyre, TransCen, Inc., Rockville, MD
    • Joyce Emmett, Danbury Public Schools, Danbury, Connecticut
    • Richard Emmett, Western Connection Program, Danbury Public Schools, Danbury, Connecticut
Summer Employment and Community Experiences of Transition-Age Youth With Severe Disabilities
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:48:59 GMT

Although early work experiences during high school represent one of the most consistent predictors of postschool employment for young adults with disabilities, little is known about how these adolescents might access these valuable transition experiences. This study examined the summer employment and community activities of 136 high school students with severe disabilities. The majority of youth was either not working (61.7%) or reported sheltered employment (11.1%). The most prominent predictors of summer employment status were holding a job during the spring semester and teacher expectations for employment. Recommendations for research and practice focus on increasing the capacity of schools, families, and communities to support the involvement of youth with severe disabilities in meaningful summer activities.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 194-212
  • Authors
    • Erik W. Carter, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Nicole Ditchman, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Ye Sun, University of Texas-Austin
    • Audrey A. Trainor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Beth Swedeen, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Laura Owens, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Tips for Transition
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:47:01 GMT

Tips for Transition

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 60-68
  • Authors
    • Ryan O. Kellems, National Post-School Outcomes Center, Secondary Special Education & Transition, University of Oregon, Eugene
    • Mary E. Morningstar, Department of Special Education, University of Kansas, Lawrence
Getting Everyone Involved Identifying Transition Opportunities for Youth With Severe Disabilitis
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:47:00 GMT

Getting Everyone Involved Identifying Transition Opportunities for Youth With Severe Disabilitis

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 38-49
  • Authors
    • Beth L. Swedeen, Special Education, Waisman Center, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Erik W. Carter, Special Education, Waisman Center, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Nancy Molfenter, Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Assessing the Transition-Related Strengths and Needs of Adolescents With High-Incidence Disabilities
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:49:00 GMT

Although meaningful assessment is considered the cornerstone of transition planning, little empirical guidance is available to inform this assessment process. This study examined the transition-related strengths and needs of 160 students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) or learning disabilities (LD) from the perspectives of special educators, parents, and youth. Teachers rated youth with EBD as evidencing more substantial needs than youth with LD across all 9 planning domains. Student's ratings were significantly higher than those of their teachers and parents. Variability in the extent to which participants reported having sufficient information to assess each domain, as well as the extent to which they considered each domain to be relevant to planning, highlights the importance of incorporating multiple perspectives into transition planning.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 74-94
  • Authors
    • Erik W. Carter, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • Audrey A. Trainor, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • Ye Sun, University of Texas, Austin
    • Laura Owens, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Mothers' Experiences of Transition Planning for Their Children With Disabilities
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:51:31 GMT

Through a review of transition literature and a synthesis of the experiences of four mothers, the authors present best practice strategies for involving parents in transition´┐Żplanning, and provide a list of Internet transition resources.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 28-36
  • Authors
    • Elizabeth Madson Ankeny, Augsburg College, Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • Julia Wilkins, St. Cloud State University, Minnesota
    • Jayne Spain, Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville, Minnesota
Quality Indicators for Competitive Employment Outcomes What Special Education Teachers Need to Know in Transition Planning
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:46:30 GMT

Quality Indicators for Competitive Employment Outcomes What Special Education Teachers Need to Know in Transition Planning

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 58-66
  • Authors
    • Valerie Ann BrookeVCU-RRTC) on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Director, Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (VCU-RRTC) on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, Richmond, Virginia
    • Grant RevellU-RRTC) on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Director, Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (VCU-RRTC) on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, Richmond, Virginia
    • Paul Wehman, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Director, Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (VCU-RRTC) on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, Richmond, Virginia
Service Works! Promoting Transition Success for Students With Disabilities Through Participation in Service Learning
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:51:30 GMT

Service learning is suggested as a pedagogical strategy which has been shown to promote academic and transition-related competencies and knowledge for all students with and without disabilities in general education classrooms.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 12-17
  • Authors
    • Michael P. O'Connor, Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Special Education, Augusta State University, Georgia
Linking Transition Assessment and Postsecondary Goals Key Elements in the Secondary Transition Planning Process
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:46:42 GMT

Individualized education programs (IEPs) for students with disabilities ages 16 and older must include a transition component. It is important for educators to understand the role transition assessment plays in developing a thorough transition component that includes measurable postsecondary goals, annual IEP goals, transition services, and a course of study. Multidisciplinary teams should consider questions such as: How can educators use information about a student's strengths, needs, and preferences to develop an effective transition plan? What role does transition assessment play in developing measurable postsecondary goals, annual IEP goals, and transition services for students with disabilities? What is the best way to link a student's annual IEP goals to postsecondary goals?

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 44-51
  • Authors
    • Valerie L. Mazzotti, Department of Special Education and Child Development
    • Dawn A. Rowe, Department of Special Education and Child Development
    • Kelly R. Kelley, Department of Special Education and Child Development
    • David W. Test, Department of Special Education and Child Development
    • Catherine H. Fowler, National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center, University of North Carolina, Charlotte
    • Paula D. Kohler, Special Education and Literacy Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
    • Larry J. Kortering, Department of Language, Reading, and Exceptionalities, Reich College of Education, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina
Step by Step Creating a Community-Based Transition Program for Students With Intellectual Disabilities
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:51:30 GMT

This article explores the steps necessary to establish a successful community-based transition program that addresses the needs of the 21st-century employer.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 6-11
  • Authors
    • Melissa A. Hartman, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, Virginia
Transition Goals and Experiences of Females With Disabilities: Youth, Parents, and Professionals
Mon, 14 Mar 2011 19:51:27 GMT

This study examined the influence of gender on the transition goals and experiences of female students with disabilities. Data were gathered from 146 participants, including female youth with disabilities (n = 67), parents of young women with disabilities (n = 34), and professionals who work with them (n = 45). Findings suggest that females with disabilities have unique experiences related to (a) type of transition goals established for them; (b) factors that shape these transition goals, such as self-perception, mentors, peers, family, and exposure to opportunities; (c) sources of support and impediments to transition to adulthood, such as special education personnel and programs; and (d) contextual issues, such as cultural and linguistic diversity. Practice and future research implications are discussed.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 215-234
  • Authors
    • JENNIFER M. HOGANSEN, Portland State University
    • KRISTIN POWERS, California State University, Long Beach
    • SARAH GEENEN, Portland State University
    • ELEANOR GIL-KASHIWABARA, Portland State University
    • LAURIE POWERS, Portland State University
Promoting Self-Determination for Transition-Age Youth: Views of High School General and Special Educators
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:48:41 GMT

Recent developments in policy and practice have emphasized the importance of promoting self-determination and supporting access to the general curriculum for youth with disabilities. To understand how these trends align, we examined the efforts of 340 general and special educators to promote student self-determination in high school classrooms. Educators attached considerable importance to providing instruction in skills related to self-determination and reported addressing these skills with moderate to high frequency in their classrooms. Although opportunities for students with disabilities to learn skills that promote self-determination were reported to be available across the curriculum, there were some differences across teachers and curricular area. We discuss avenues for promoting student self-determination within the general curriculum, as well as offer recommendations for future research.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 55-70
  • Authors
    • Erik W. Carter, Vanderbilt University
    • Kathleen L. Lane, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Melinda R. Pierson, California State University-Fullerton
    • Kristin K. Stang, California State University-Fullerton
Are You and Your Students Bored With the Benchmarks? Sinking Under the Standards? Then Transform Your Teaching Through Transition!
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:50:57 GMT

Benchmarks and standards have become an important part of our instructional focus since the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. As educators we all recognize the importance of having high expectations of our students. Standards help schools articulate these expectations clearly to students, their parents, and the community. Yet, there are some substantial difficulties in using standards for instructional planning. Also, the use of standards does not ensure that teaching is engaging and effective. A means for solving some of these concerns is to incorporate transition needs with standards-based instruction. Transition can be a vehicle for incorporating research-based instructional practices that utilize authentic problem-based learning that is motivating, engaging, and effective (Freiberg & Driscoll, 2005; Institute of Educational Sciences [IES], 1999, 2003; Mastropieri & Scruggs, 2002; Valverde & Schmidt, 1997-1998).

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 39-46
  • Authors
    • Pamela Luft, Educational Foundations and Special Services, Kent State University, Ohio
    • Christina M. Brown, Educational Foundations and Special Services, Kent State University, Ohio
    • Laurie J. Sutherin, Educational Foundations and Special Services, Kent State University, Ohio
Transition to Employment: Role of the Family in Career Development
Mon, 14 Mar 2011 19:51:16 GMT

This study investigated the role of the family in career development and postschool employment outcomes for young adults with learning disabilities. Using a multiple-case study design, the authors examined a set of family structural and process variables. Fifty-nine in-depth interviews were conducted with young adults, parents, and school staff. Family structure was not directly linked to employment outcomes, but family socioeconomic status was related to initial career decision making and vocational identity development. Family process variables, including family relationships, involvement, support and advocacy, career aspirations, and intentional career-related activities worked in combination to form 3 patterns of family interaction labeled (a) advocates, (b) protectors, and (c) removed. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 348-366
  • Authors
    • LAUREN LINDSTROM, University of Oregon
    • BONNIE DOREN, University of Oregon
    • JENNIFER METHENY, University of Oregon
    • PAM JOHNSON, University of Oregon
    • CLAIRE ZANE, University of Oregon
Bridging the Transition Gap From High School to College Preparing Students With Disabilities for a Successful Postsecondary Experience
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:51:04 GMT

John is a recent high school graduate who began his postsecondary educational career at a public 4-year university. He was identified as a student with a learning disability in second grade and received services throughout the K-12 setting. John is now a first-year student at the university. This article uses John's experience to describe the transition process and circumstances that may arise during the critical first year of college.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 12-15
  • Authors
    • Lynn A. Gil, Office for Students with Disabilities, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton
Self-Determination Skills and Opportunities of Transition-Age Youth With Emotional Disturbance and Learning Disabilities
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:48:18 GMT

This study examined the self-determination of adolescents with emotional disturbance (ED) and learning disabilities (LD) from the perspectives of special educators, parents, and the students themselves. Differences in self-determination ratings were associated with both disability group and respondent. Specifically, adolescents with ED were found to have lower ratings of self-determination than students with LD, with the most pronounced differences evident from the teacher perspective. Furthermore, students with ED identified infrequent opportunities at school and home for engaging in self-determined behavior, whereas educators and parents differed in their assessments of opportunities in each setting. Implications regarding increasing the self-determination skills and opportunities of adolescents with disabilities are discussed.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 333-346
  • Authors
    • Erik W. Carter, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Kathleen L. Lane, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University
    • Melinda R. Pierson, California State University-Fullerton
    • Barbara Glaeser, California State University-Fullerton
I Can Search for Jobs on the Internet! A Web Site That Helps Youth in Transition Identify Preferred Employment
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:50:50 GMT

I Can Search for Jobs on the Internet! A Web Site That Helps Youth in Transition Identify Preferred Employment

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 6-11
  • Authors
    • Robert L. Morgan, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Utah State University, Logan
    • Rebecca B. Morgan, Technology, Research, and Innovation in Special Education (TRI-SPED), Utah State University, Logan
    • Dallas Despain, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Utah State University, Logan
    • Eleazar Vasquez, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Utah State University, Logan