Resources for Gifted Education

CEC offers a variety of publications, journal articles and products to support effective identification and instruction of high-ability students, including:

U-STARS~PLUS Professional Development Kit

As with any new instructional framework, the incorporation of training is paramount to embracing all the benefits that U-STARS~PLUS provides. Containing all the components of the Teacher’s Set, plus a Personnel Preparation CD (not for individual sale) that contains more than 15 presentations to fully engage teachers in providing instruction that facilitates student learning “at-potential.”

Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom

This realistic and creative resource helps teachers identify young children who are gifted and tailor the learning environment to meet their needs. Dozens of handout masters and an extensive reference section help make this an excellent selection.

Identification of Students for Gifted and Talented Programs

Focusing on one of the most widely discussed and debated topics in the field, this book presents a cross-section of the most noteworthy theories and practices the leading experts in giftedness and talent identification have to offer. Presented in a straight forward fashion, the key research, ideas, and concepts in this ready-reference lend both wisdom and clarity to the pressing issues surrounding gifted and talented student identification; leading to enlightened policies and more effective prac...

CEC Journal Articles on Gifted Education

CEC
Applying an RTI Model for Students With Learning Disabilities Who Are Gifted
Fri, 20 Dec 2013 15:59:16 GMT

The difficulties of meeting the needs of twice-exceptional students, including gifted students with learning disabilities (LD), have been well documented in literature. These students have often remained unidentified due to the masking effect and their ability to compensate for their areas of weakness. Once identified, programming has been an issue: remediation might become the focus while the strengths are ignored. Response to Intervention (RtI) presents exciting possibilities for addressing both strengths and weaknesses in the general education classroom. The purpose of this article is to provide the classroom teacher with strategies and resources to do just that.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category RtI, gifted with LD, twice-exceptional, differentiation, accommodations
  • Pages 42-52
  • Authors
    • Nina Yssel, Department of Special Education, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
    • Cheryll Adams, Center for Gifted Studies and Talent Development
    • Laura S. Clarke, Department of Special Education, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
    • Ruth Jones, Department of Special Education, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
Maternal Scaffolding of Analogy and Metacognition in the Early Pretence of Gifted Children
Tue, 15 Feb 2011 17:51:31 GMT

This study investigated whether mothers of children assessed as having gifted/high IQ at 5 years were more likely to scaffold their children in analogical and metacognitive thinking during the infant/toddler period than mothers of children with more typical IQs. The researcher videotaped 21 children in monthly play sessions with their mothers, from the time that the children were 8 months old until they were 17 months old, and coded the mothers' verbalizations for scaffolding of analogical and metacognitive thinking. A psychologist assessed these children on the Stanford-Binet IV (Thorndike, 1986) and found ability levels ranging from average to high. Analysis showed that mothers of the children with high IQs introduced analogical and metacognitive scaffolding earlier than mothers of children with average IQs. The findings are consistent with a bidirectional model of gifted development in which mothers respond to support advanced development from infancy.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 351-366
  • Authors
    • Anne-Marie Morrissey, School of Education, Deakin University (Burwood), Victoria 3217, Australia
Inside and Outside Gifted Education Programming: Hidden Challenges for African American Students
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:48:29 GMT

This qualitative study used Critical Race Theory as a theoretical framework to examine the meaning, context, and process by which 12 African American students in gifted education programs formulated perceptions of their experiences in those programs. The following themes emerged from the semistructured, biographical questionnaires and individual interviews: (a) critical issues facing gifted African American students; (b) ways that the students navigate the perils of gifted education; and (c) the benefits of gifted education. These themes highlight the salience of race inside and outside gifted education programs. The research findings also provide practical applications for teachers, principals, school counselors, and parents.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 433-450
  • Authors
    • Malik S. Henfield, The University of Iowa
    • James L. Moore, The Ohio State University
    • Chris Wood, Seattle University
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Gifted Education: Recruitment and Retention Issues
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:48:32 GMT

The field of gifted education has faced criticism about the underrepresentation of African American, Hispanic/Latino, and American Indian students who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) in its programs. This article proposes that efforts targeting both recruitment and retention barriers are essential to remedying this disparity. Educators' deficit thinking about CLD students underlies both areas (recruitment and retention) and contributes to underrepresentation in significant, meaningful ways. The authors examine factors hindering the recruitment and retention of CLD students in gifted education, attending in particular to definitions and theories, testing, and referral issues, and offer recommendations for improving the representation of CLD students in gifted education.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 289-306
  • Authors
    • Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University
    • Tarek C. Grantham, University of Georgia
    • Gilman W. Whiting, Vanderbilt University
Academic Strategies That Work for Gifted Students With Learning Disabilities
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:50:31 GMT

Academic Strategies That Work for Gifted Students With Learning Disabilities

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 28-32
  • Authors
    • Mary Ruth Coleman, Frank Porter Graham Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Making a Difference: Motivating Gifted Students Who Are Not Achieving
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:50:30 GMT

Making a Difference: Motivating Gifted Students Who Are Not Achieving

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 22-27
  • Authors
    • Del Siegle, Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs
    • D. Betsy McCoach, Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs
Puzzles, Mysteries, and Picasso: A Summer Camp for Students Who Are Gifted and Learning Disabled
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:50:32 GMT

Puzzles, Mysteries, and Picasso: A Summer Camp for Students Who Are Gifted and Learning Disabled

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 42-46
  • Authors
    • Nina Yssel, Department of Special Education Doctoral Student, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
    • Judith Margison, Department of Educational Psychology, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
    • Tracy Cross, Department of Special Education, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
    • John Merbler, Department of Special Education, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
What We Have Learned: Experiences in Providing Adaptations and Accommodations for Gifted and Talented Students With Learning Disabilities
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:50:32 GMT

What We Have Learned: Experiences in Providing Adaptations and Accommodations for Gifted and Talented Students With Learning Disabilities

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 48-54
  • Authors
    • Rich Weinfeld, Silver Spring, Maryland
    • Linda Barnes-Robinson, Rockville, Maryland
    • Sue Jeweler, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland
    • Betty Roffman Shevitz, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland
Strategy Acquisition and Maintenance of Gifted and Nongifted Young Children
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:47:50 GMT

Young children's strategy acquisition and maintenance were examined by comparing the recall, clustering, and study behaviors of children of different ages and intelligences. Three groups were included in the study: 5-year-old gifted children, 5-year-old nongifted children, and 7-yearold nongifted children. All were observed and measured on 5 consecutive days, with training on strategy use provided on the third day. Several differences among groups were found, generally favoring the gifted children in terms of performance and maintenance of strategies. In addition, the 5-year-old gifted children seemed to spontaneously use categorization strategies and clustered items in recall before training, while the 7-year-old children used categorization and clustering in recall after training. Implications for instruction for gifted students are discussed.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 497-505
  • Authors
    • Seokhee Cho, Korean Educational Development Institute, Seoul, Korea
    • Doehee Ahn, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea
Looking Outside and Inside: Self-Concept Development of Gifted Adolescents
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:47:10 GMT

The internal/external frame of reference model (Marsh, 1986) was proposed to explain the development of academic self-concepts for general ability samples. Recent research calls into question the model's applicability for gifted adolescents' academic self-concept development. This model was examined for 131 adolescents participating in a summer program for academically talented students. Results suggest that the model is useful in understanding the academic self-concept development of students who are gifted, with no significant differences among students with demonstrable strengths in mathematics, verbal areas, or both areas. Educators should be aware that exceptional performance in one area, such as mathematics, will probably have a positive impact in mathematics self-concept but a negative impact on other academic self-concepts, such as verbal self-concept.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 535-548
  • Authors
    • Jonathan A. Plucker, Indiana University
    • Vicki B. Stocking, Duke University
Revisiting the Schoolwide Enrichment Model´┐ŻAn Approach to Gifted Programming
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 13:49:25 GMT

Revisiting the Schoolwide Enrichment Model´┐ŻAn Approach to Gifted Programming

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Journal Article
  • Pages 48-53
  • Authors
    • Sherry Gibson, Ph.D., Adrian Dominican School of Education, Barry University, Miami Shores, Florida
    • Joan Efinger, School of Nursing, Barry University, Miami Shores, Florida