Preconvention Workshops

Wednesday, April 9

Start your CEC 2014 professional development experience with one of our full- or half-day preconvention workshops.  Learn practical, evidence-based information important to you and your students, presented by topic area experts. Attend any preconvention workshop and earn CEC Professional Development Hours (PDHs)! (6 PDHs for a full-day workshop and 3 PDHs for a half-day workshop.)

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A separate registration fee is required for preconvention workshops.

 

*Materials fee added to the registration rate for this workshop.
**Exhibitor workshop

Registration Type

Full-Day

Workshops

Half-Day

Workshops

Workshops with Material Fees

Program Developer Workshop

Full-Day

Half-Day

Member

$229

$139

$259

$169

$375

Nonmember

$279

$189

$309

$219

$525

Student Member

$137

$83

$167

$113

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Life/Retired

$137

$83

$167

$113

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Full-Day Worshops

Half-Day Workshops

Full-Day Workshops (9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.)

WORKSHOP 1: Colleague-to-Colleague Helping: Beyond the Quick Fix

Leader: Stuart Gerber, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT

Colleagues typically turn to one another for help in working with students who have special needs. However, informal support for everyday work problems is often given on the run with hit-or-miss, quick fix advice. Learn how to replace the quick fix with a fast, systematic, and empowering process that utilizes procedures from teaching, counseling, and consulting. This field-tested approach has been used effectively in over 50 schools. It is quick, fits into breaks or short intervals in the work day, and requires little or no advance planning. Guided practice and case simulations will enhance skill building.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the limitations and pitfalls of quick-fix helping.
  • Build skills for helping colleagues analyze and resolve work problems.
  • Consider when and how to implement brief, systematic helping on the job.

Who Should Attend? Special and General Educators, Administrators and Supervisors, Department, Unit, Project, and Team Leaders

WORKSHOP 2: Evidence-Based Early Identification and Intervention Practices for Infants and Toddlers With ASD and Their Families

Leader: Samuel L. Odom, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Presenters: Ann Cox, Suzanne Kucharczyk, Evelyn Shaw, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is currently being diagnosed at very young ages, reaching well into infancy.  Learn about early identification and assessment practices, an approach to assessing the quality of early intervention programs,  intervention practices that have evidence of efficacy (Evidence-based practices or EBPs),and  a process for linking IFSP outcomes and benchmarks to specific EBPs. 

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three practices that may lead to early identification of infants and toddler with ASD.
  • Identify the key quality features of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with ASD.
  • Construct a Goal Attainment Scale to evaluate progress that children and families make on identified goals.
  • Identify evidence-based practices for infants and toddlers with ASD and their families.

Who Should Attend? Special and General Educators (Early Childhood & Elementary), Administrators and Supervisors

WORKSHOP 3: Evidence-Based Strategies for Vocabulary Instruction for Elementary Students With Disabilities

Leader: Renee Greenfield, University of Hartford, Connecticut

It is essential that both monolingual and multilingual elementary students with language or learning disabilities receive evidence-based vocabulary instruction. Examine explicit teaching methods and strategies and explore ways to integrate these strategies into practice. Workshop participants will work together to create context-appropriate strategy instruction plans.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify at least four strategies for vocabulary instruction for elementary students with language or learning disabilities.
  • Identify at least four strategies for vocabulary instruction for elementary, multilingual learners with language or learning disabilities.

Who Should Attend? Special and General Educators (Elementary), Speech/Language Pathologists, Administrators and Supervisors, Paraeducators

WORKSHOP 4: Having Hard Conversations

Leader: Jennifer Abrams, Palo Alto, California

As educators at all levels, we sometimes find ourselves in situations where difficult topics must be addressed.  What do we know about the best strategies for those moments?  What questions should we be asking ourselves before we speak up and what words shall we use so the conversation can be as humane and growth producing as possible? This interactive workshop addresses a wide range of situations and concerns, including communications with supervisors, peers, and parents. Learn how to speak with clarity and courage to directly address difficult situations within your schools or organizations, no matter what your role.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify why they hesitate having hard conversations.
  • Design questions to ask themselves before they choose to speak up.
  • Articulate in professional language the challenges they are facing. 
  • Determine the goals of the conversation and write an action plan of support.
  • Script the conversation avoiding trigger words that put others on the defensive.
  • Choose the best ‘wheres’ and ‘whens’ for a productive discussion. 

Who Should Attend? Special and General Educators (all levels),  Administrators and Supervisors, Related Service Professionals, Mental Health Professionals, Parents and Families, Speech/Language Pathologists, Administrators and Supervisors (building, district, state level), Paraeducators

WORKSHOP 5: Apps and Universal Design for Learning: iMake and Take for iPads and Other Devices

Leader: Alexandra Dunn, Upper Canada District School Board, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Presenter: Luis Perez, University of South Florida, Tampa

Why wait for developers to design content to meet student goals?  Armed with a class profile and student objectives, join our imagination stations and learn how you and your students can design your own accessible digital materials.  BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) or share with neighbors as we explore how Apple accessibility and creativity apps such as iMovie, Toontastic, Book Creator, Explain Everything, SMART Notebook, Strip Designer, Talking Larry, and Pic Collage can support universal design for learning (UDL) principles – multiple means of representation, expression and engagement - so that ALL students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 can achieve academic and social participation.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Identify how iPads and creativity apps can be used as part of a UDL Toolkit to support academic and social participation for ALL students in collaborative, inclusive learning environments.   
  • Create and empower their students to design their own accessible digital content using creation apps – iMovie, Toontastic, Book Creator, Explain Everything, SMART Notebook, Strip Designer, Talking Larry, and Pic Collage. 
  • Identify new features of Apple’s accessibility profile, which support areas including Vision, Hearing, Physical & Motor, Learning.    
  • Understand how features built into iPad and apps can be harnessed for those students who need social, communication, physical, hearing, literacy and vision supports, so no child is left on the outside of education looking in.

Who Should Attend? Special and General Educators (all levels), Administrators and Supervisors, Paraeducators, Parents and Families, Students, Teacher Educators, First Year Professionals, Related Service Professionals

WORKSHOP 6: Multi-Tiered Instruction, Support, and Assessment for English Learners: Making Appropriate Decisions

Leaders: Julie Esparza Brown, Portland State University, OR; Claudia Rinaldi, Education Development Center, Newton, MA

Since the passage of NCLB, schools are charged with educating all groups of students to achieve at high levels.  Given the varying backgrounds and diversity of English learner students, schools are challenged to provide appropriate and effective instruction that leads to grade level achievement.  Using interactive presentations and case studies,  review the critical student characteristics that must guide instruction and interventions in all bilingual program models (from ELD only to dual language models).  Learn about progress monitoring tools that are effective with ELs, a unique framework for enhancing interventions, and a framework for least biased Tier 3 assessment.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Consider the unique factors in EL students’ background and make appropriate adjustments to instruction and interventions.
  • Choose progress monitoring tools with demonstrated reliability and validity for ELs.
  • Make decisions on appropriate growth for each EL student in consideration of their unique context.
  • Determine appropriate language of intervention in all bilingual program models (early-exit to dual language).
  • Apply a framework for least biased assessment in Tier 3 that systematically considers the cultural loading and linguistic demand of assessments.

Who Should Attend? Special and General Educators (all levels), Administrators and Supervisors, Team Leaders

WORKSHOP 7: Understanding Students With Autism Through Art *

Leader: Beverly Levett Gerber, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven
Presenters: Juliann B. Dorff, Kent State University, OH; Susan D. Loesl, Milwaukee Public Schools, WI; and Lynne Horoschak, Moore College of Art & Design, Philadelphia, PA

The visual language is Temple Grandin’s primary language. Grandin, a prominent author and speaker on the subject of autism, states, “Many students with autism think in visual pictures and learn visually.” In fact, many on the spectrum have excelled in art, their visual language. They communicate thoughts, feelings, and their understanding of the world through art media. This interactive workshop demonstrates how classroom teachers can encourage self-expression and communication through art. Understanding Students With Autism Through Art chapter authors share their teaching stories and art approaches, slides of student artwork, and hands-on art lessons and activities for students on the autism spectrum.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate open-ended art lessons that encourage individual expression from closed-ended lessons that easily frustrate students.
  • Describe adaptive art lessons and strategies for students on the spectrum.
  • Describe art theory to practice special education training for preservice and graduate program art teachers.
  • Describe a community art program for students on the spectrum.

Who Should Attend? Special and General Educators (all levels), Teacher Educators, Art Educators, Parents and Families

WORKSHOP 8: Schoolwide and Classroom Procedures for Increasing Student Motivation and Reducing Apathy*

Leader: Randy Sprick, Safe & Civil Schools, Eugene, Oregon

“This student is just not motivated!” Examine motivation from an “expectancy times value” framework and learn specific strategies for teachers, administrators, and supervisors to increase students’ expectancy of success and for increasing students’ value of being successful—the two variables that can be manipulated to increase motivation. Attendees will learn techniques and  strategies that have a track record of success in the research literature and  can make a difference in student motivation and achievement. When implemented well all of these strategies are respectful of diversity and can be implemented through a lens of culturally responsive practices. Participants will leave with a behavior-intervention plan for improving the motivation of one or more students..

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the “expectancy times value” theory of motivation.
  • Analyze an individual student’s motivation by attributing the lack of motivation to expectancy, value, or both.
  • Design an intervention plan to increase a student’s motivation.
  • Analyze an individual student’s motivation by attributing the lack of motivation to expectancy, value, or both.
  • Design an intervention plan to increase a student’s motivation.

Who Should Attend: Special and General Educators (all levels), Administrators and Supervisors

WORKSHOP 9: Paraeducator Employment, Training, Supervision and Evaluation: Legal and Ethical Issues

Leader: Kent Gerlach, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Washington

This workshop will address the current legal and ethical issues involving employment, training, supervision and evaluation of paraeducators. Topics will include clarification of the appropriate role of paraeducators and the need for state and local policy regarding their role in instruction. ESEA and IDEA require “Appropriate Supervision of Paraprofessionals, but how is “appropriate supervision” defined? The quality indicators for designing staff development for paraeducators and teachers as well as criteria for developing appropriate job descriptions for paraeducators and teachers will be discussed. Recent legal and ethical cases involving paraeducator qualifications and supervision will also be discussed, including “Parents Right to Know.”

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Understand the current national issues affecting paraeducators and their supervisors and explore common barriers to effective supervision of paraeducators.
  • Understand the importance of state and local policy regarding paraeducators qualifications, training and supervision as well as the current legal issues involving paraeducators and their supervisors.
  • Understand the importance of developing ethical guidelines for paraeducators who assist with instruction and for teachers who supervise. CEC’s new Professional Standards regarding Paraeducator Supervision and Training will be distributed.
  • Clarify the role of supervising teacher and the paraeductors.
  • Understand what parents need to know about paraeducators who assist with instruction.
  • Discuss the foundation for building effective paraeducator/teacher teams.

Who Should Attend: Special and General Educators (all levels), Administrators and Supervisors, Paraeducators, Related Service Professionals

WORKSHOP 10: Program Developer and Program Reviewer Workshops: CEC National Program *

Leaders: Joni Baldwin, University of Dayton, Ohio and Christy Hooser, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston

10A. Program Developer Workshop: How to Prepare the Program Recognition Reports

10B. Program Reviewer Workshop: How to Review CEC Program Recognition Reports (No cost for approved applicants for Program Reviewer Workshop)

WORKSHOP 10A: Program Developer Workshop: How to Prepare the Program Recognition Reports

Leader: Christy Hooser, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston

The CEC Program Developer Workshop assists individuals in the development of CEC Preparation Program Recognition Reports. Participants will interact with colleagues and the consultants and learn the components of a performance-based teacher preparation program. All participants completing the workshop will receive What Every Special Educator Must Know: Ethics Standards and Guidelines and the CEC Program Developer Resources.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Understand the CEC program recognition report process and cycle.
  • Discuss the essential elements of a program report.
  • Develop program performance-based assessments.
  • Align program assessments with major elements of the CEC Content Standards.
  • Collect and analyze program data on their candidates.
  • Use data to analyze current program strengths and weaknesses.
  • Present aggregated data.
  • Develop the program report.
  • Identify exemplars of program recognition report components, and tips for high quality program recognition reports.
  • Identify resources for further support in developing a program report.

Who Should Attend? Special education college and university personnel interested in learning to develop program reports for the CEC program recognition process.

*Special Note*: Workshop 10A and 10B will be combined into one workshop with a group session in the AM and breakout sessions in the PM.

(No cost for approved applicants for Program Reviewer Workshop)

WORKSHOP 10B: Program Reviewer Workshop: How to Review CEC Program Recognition Reports

Leader: Christy Hooser, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston

The CEC Preparation Program Review Report Reviewer Workshop is designed to assist individuals preparing to become a CEC Preparation Program Reviewer. Participants learn to review CEC Preparation Program Recognition Reports on the preparation of special education professionals and to prepare CEC Program Review Reports. Principles for and examples of performance-based program review, strategies for efficiently reviewing reports, and examples and strategies for successfully writing the sections of the CEC Program Recognition Review will be presented and discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to interact with colleagues and the consultant. All participants completing the workshop will receive What Every Special Educator Must Know: Ethics Standards and Guidelines and the CEC Program Reviewer resources.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the steps and components in reviewing a CEC Preparation Program Recognition Report.
  • Assure program assessments align with the major elements of the CEC Content Standards as informed by the appropriate specialty set(s).
  • Review special education preparation programs for CEC recognition.
  • Determine if the program data demonstrates candidate mastery and if the data informs program improvement.
  • Describe how to obtain further support in developing a CEC Program Review Report.

Who Should Attend? Special education college higher education personnel preparing to become a CEC Program Reviewer. You must be prior approved to become a program reviewer. Please complete the CEC Program Reviewer application and submit it, along with your vita, to prostandards@cec.sped.org prior to the workshop. You will be notified when your application is approved.

Half-Day Workshops (9:00 a.m. – noon and 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.) Times are subject to change

WORKSHOP 11: Exceeding the Standard:  A Practical Guide to Developing and Implementing IEP Goals Aligned with the Common Core (9:00 a.m. – noon)

Leader: Jessica Yates, Regional School Unit #13, Rockland, Maine

Looking through the lens of a special educator and a district level administrator, the presenter will delve into the process of writing IEP goals aligned with grade level Common Core State Standards as a means to ensure all students achieve college and career readiness. Explore both the rationale for writing aligned IEP goals and specific details about the functionality of these efforts at the local level.  You will receive an introduction to goal construction techniques, familiarize yourself with provided tools, and engage in supported practice writing grade-level aligned goals. 

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the rationale for writing IEP goals aligned with the student’s grade level Common Core State Standards.
  • Identify each component of an IEP goal aligned with a student’s grade level Common Core State Standards.
  • Construct IEP goals aligned with a student’s grade level Common Core State Standards.

Who Should Attend? Special Educators, Administrators and Supervisors, Paraeducators

WORKSHOP 12: Leading the Co-Teaching Dance: Strategies for Enhancing Team Outcomes (9:00 a.m. – noon) *

Leaders: Lisa Dieker, University of Central Florida, Orlando; Wendy Murawski, California State University, Northridge

When observing co-teaching for feedback and evaluation purposes, administrators, co-teaching teams, and school leaders need to know what they are looking, listening, and asking for. The presenters will clarify the approaches to co-instruction and help identify potential problem areas, as well as discuss how to work with conflict situations. Learn about the importance of data collection, strategies for setting goals, and building on success in order to institutionalize co-teaching practice. Each participant will leave with a copy of the bestselling CEC book Leading the Co-Teaching Dance.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain what co-teaching is and is not.
  • Describe the structures necessary to develop a collaborative culture able to sustain co-teaching. 
  • Reveal the mistakes that many schools make and give tips for avoiding those mistakes.
  • Share strategies for planning and scheduling.
  • Understand the importance of data collection, strategies for setting goals, and how to build on success in order to institutionalize co-teaching.

Who Should Attend? Special and General educators (all levels), Administrators and Supervisors

WORKSHOP 13: Life Centered Education – CEC’s Newly Revised Life Skills Curriculum & Assessment Web Portal (9:00 a.m. – noon) *

Leaders: Erin Adelsberger, Baltimore, MD

Learn about the processes and procedures for implementing the assessment and instructional components of the Life Centered Education curriculum, a motivating and effective classroom, home, and community-based curriculum designed to prepare students to function independently and productively.

This in-depth and comprehensive life skills curriculum, aligned with the Common Core State Standards, identifies three critical domains for adult living in the 21st century - daily living skills, self-determination and interpersonal skills, and employment skills. It incorporates 94 life skills and competencies, with differentiated lesson plans and objectives for each one.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Explain the components and use of the curriculum.
  • Discuss revisions to the curriculum and its implementation.

Who Should Attend? Special Educators (all levels), Administrators and Supervisors, Paraeducators, Parents and Families, Community Agency Providers

WORKSHOP 14: Six Successful Strategies for Teaching Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to Students With Moderate to Severe Disabilities (1:00 - 4:0 0 p.m.)

Leader: Ginevra Courtade, University of Louisville, Kentucky

Presenters: Bree Jimenez, The University of North Carolina, Greensboro; Diane Browder, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Presenters will offer six instructional strategies to assist educators in generating ideas for creating access to the CCSS and teaching to measurable, standards-based objectives that are relevant and meaningful for students with moderate and severe disabilities including: (1) applying universal design of learning (UDL) for ALL students; (2) involving students in their own learning; (3) using  assistive technology; (4) using systematic instruction; (5) incorporating embedded instruction, inquiry science, and graphic organizers; and (6) teaching to generalization    

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify major elements of UDL
  • Identify specific strategies (e.g., self-determination, graphic organizers) used to develop instruction aligned with standards-based IEP goals and objectives for students with moderate and severe disabilities based on the CCSS.
  • Create standards-based instructional plans for students who access curriculum at various levels.

Who Should Attend? Special Educators (all levels), Administrators and Supervisors

WORKSHOP 15: What Every Educator Needs To Know About the Coming Changes to Special Education Policy (9:00 a.m. – noon)

Leaders:  Deborah Ziegler and Kim Hymes, Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA

In this wide-ranging presentation, CEC’s Policy and Advocacy headquarters team will analyze education policies currently under discussion in Washington, D.C., review the recent changes to education policy supported by the Administration and Congress and examine its impact on children and youth with disabilities and/or gifts and talents.

Topics will include the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), also known as No Child Left Behind - with a special focus on its most controversial provisions – like teacher evaluation systems, turnaround models, restraint and seclusion, assessment and accountability, and charter schools. Additionally, the team will review ongoing implementation of the ESEA waivers, and legislative updates on the Workforce Investment Act, Education Sciences Reform Act, the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act, IDEA Full Funding Act, early childhood initiatives, and relevant administrative guidance published by the U.S. Department of Education.  The team will also review the status of the federal education budget and how it affects state and local programs.  Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their experiences based on new and pending federal policies. 

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Identify and understand key special/gifted education policy issues currently under consideration by the Obama Administration and U.S. Congress.
  • Understand issues complicating the reauthorization of ESEA/NCLB.
  • Understand relevant U.S. Department of Education guidance.
  • Understand upcoming federal budget procedures and process.
  • Understand CEC’s recommendations and positions on key policy issues.

Who should attend? Special Educators, Administrators and Supervisors, Related Service Professionals, Higher Education Professionals

WORKSHOP 16: Behavior Readiness for the General Education Setting: The Student Inventory for Behavior Support (SIBS) Helps Make the Decision (1:00 – 4:00 p.m.) **

Leader: John Caliso, Winsor Learning, St. Paul, MN

Fifty-six percent of special education students now spend at least 80% of their in time in general education classes. It is critical to determine their level of behavior readiness, and magnitude of interventions to help them succeed. Attendees will learn about  how SIBS formulates a student profile for “behavior readiness” that is linked to evidenced-based data. The data yields (1) behavioral graphs that describe a student’s capacity for pro-work versus nonengaged learning behaviors, (2) frequency of teacher interventions to obtain pro-work behavior, and (3) Strength of Student Independence (SSI).  The SSI is comprised of percentiles and cut-off scores for magnitude of interventions/supports required by the student, and level of engagement in the learning process.  The data identifies the range of supports that may be included in an intervention plan.At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how SIBS produces data to describe “behavior readiness” for the general education classroom setting.
  • Discuss the importance of the Strength of Student Independence index to determine whether the student is engaged in the learning process, and the intensity of interventions required for student success.
  • Secure a basic ability to interpret data from actual case illustrations for pro-work versus non-engaged behavior, frequency of teacher interventions, and implications for an intervention plan.

Who Should Attend? Administrators and Supervisors, Special and General Educators

 

Please check back frequently for updates!